Monday, May 25, 2020

Summary of Triumph of the Nerds - 1449 Words

In the early 1980’s computers were unknown. The only real computers were called mainframe computers and they took up an entire room in size. They used a special code called binary that only worked with 1’s and O’s. All of the data had to be inputted by stretches of tape or by flipping switches. It took people to develop a computer language for the computer to take off. The first language was called Cobal and it was followed by Fortran and Basic. Because of the large size of computers, having one would require having space big enough to house a room size machine. It took a company named Intel and its founder Gordon Moore, to develop a microprocessor, which shrunk down the size of the processor by placing millions of transistors on a single†¦show more content†¦The 1978 show drew thousands of people and Apple â€Å"stole the show†. Within 2 years of the show, sales at Apple were enormous; they were making more money than they could spend. After the release of Apple 2 many more people started to use P.C’s. But there was a problem; the P’C’s still had no real purpose or application to make everyone want to have one. It took the genius of Dan Brinklin, a professor at Harvard, to come up with the help of programmer Bob Franston, to come up with a spreadsheet program called Visicalc (visible calculator). Viscalc hit the market in 1979 selling for 100 dollars. It could do in seconds what it took an entire day for one person to do on a computer. The spreadsheet answered the â€Å"what if† questions. Thanks to Viscalc the Apple 2 made history. Unfortunately the creators of Viscalc did not patent their spreadsheet idea, thus they did not make the money that men like Jobs, Wozniak and Gates made. Although Ed Roberts invented the computer, Jobs and Wozniak are the ones who became multi-millionaires. The P.C. market became a billion dollar industry which 50% of the market belongs to Apple. The nerds had inheri ted the earth. While watching television recently I noticed that a movie will be coming out in the next few days about Steve Jobs. I have heard bits and pieces about his life and what type of person he was, plus I knew Apple was started in a garage. This video was very interesting; itShow MoreRelatedAN ANALYSIS PAPER ON ANTON CHEKHOV’S THE SEAGULL AND THE CHERRY ORCHARD12092 Words   |  49 PagesCharacterization and Dialogue 1.6.2 Impartial Witnesses 1.7 Anton Chekhov and his Beliefs/ Values 1.7.1 Six Principles for Writing 1.7.2 Positive Values 1.7.2.1 Freedom 1.7.2.2 Charity 1.7.2.3 Truthfulness 2. Analysis for Content and Substance 2.1 Summary/ Synopsis 2.1.1 The Seagull 2.1.2 The Cherry Orchard 2.2 Appropriate Approaches to Literature 2.2.1 Reader-Response Approach 2.2.2 Feministic Approach 2.2.3 Psycho-analytic Approach 2.2.4 Archetypal Approach 2.2.5 Historical ApproachRead MoreInnovators Dna84615 Words   |  339 Pagesshareholders because we won’t be swinging for the fences.† In short, innovators rely on their â€Å"courage to innovate†Ã¢â‚¬â€an active bias against the status quo and an unï ¬â€šinching willingness to take smart risks—to transform ideas into powerful impact. In summary, the DNA of innovators—or the code for generating innovative ideas—is expressed in the model shown in ï ¬ gure 1-1. The key skill for generating innovative ideas is the cognitive skill of associational thinking. The reason that some people generate

Thursday, May 14, 2020

True Love By Wislawa Szymborska - 876 Words

What would you imagine when hearing the words true love, many may think of the joy and happiness of two humans falling for each other in ways only they would know. An exiguous amount of people want what they see in other couples, a connection, a true love. However, with the poem â€Å"True Love† by Wislawa Szymborska, the speaker despises what she witnesses when surrounded by couples. The speaker conveys that she is having a mental argument whether or not true love is possible or even if she can obtain true love. Readers of the poem might wonder why the speaker has strong feelings with the thought of love; however, with further analysis of the diction, tone and word choice we can see her aspiration and fight for true love. Reading through â€Å"True Love,† he speaker has evident and bleak feelings towards love by stating, †Look at the happy couple./ Couldn’t they at least try to hide it,† or â€Å"it’s obviously a plot behind the human race’s back!† With further analysis on Szymborska, she had complications with her relationships and true love as well. Her first marriage only lasted for six years until divorce and in her next relationship she neither lived with her partner nor got married (â€Å"Wislawa Szymborsa†¦Ã¢â‚¬ ). Due to her troubles with love before the writing of this poem, the speaker sounds quite offended by the thought of many around her in love and showing affection because of the struggle to find true love herself. Even though the narrator asseverates bitter feelings towards ones inShow MoreRelatedTrue Love By Wislawa Szymborska864 Words   |  4 Pagesâ€Å"True Love† by Wislawa Szymborska In the poem â€Å"True Love† by Wislawa Szymborska, the author explores the concept and authenticity of true love by conveying a sarcastic tone through a dubious perspective. Szymborska’s use of diction, figurative language, and irony provides the reader with a parallel point-of-view about the existence of true love. Beginning a poem with questions creates a sense of wonder and imagination into a reader’s mind about the theme. The pessimistic attitude towards trueRead MoreHappiness in True Love After reading â€Å"True Love† I have concluded that Szymborska is trying600 Words   |  3 PagesHappiness in True Love After reading â€Å"True Love† I have concluded that Szymborska is trying promoting true love to the people who don’t believe, by stating the positive aspects to make people live a happier life. In the poem â€Å"True Love† by Wislawa Szymborska, it is obviously talking about true love such as how it happens, and when people are in love or a relationship. She uses a continuous form of sarcasm of people who do believe in true in love, and those who do. This making her a believer, createsRead MoreI Think Romantic Love Is Universal Because It Is A Legacy Of Humanity s Shared Evolutionary Past797 Words   |  4 Pagesmeaning of love? Love is a powerful emotional and spiritual recognition. It can provide a deep happiness, and a deep suffering when unfulfilled. Love is one of the most valuable and cherished feelings in people’s lives. Love is known since the time of Adam and Eve. It makes one feel as if nothing else is needed in order to survive in this worl d. The definitions of love are the same and yet different. There are many authors in stories and poems that use romantic love like Shakespeare and Wislawa SzymborskaRead MoreTrue Love2046 Words   |  9 PagesExplication: â€Å"True Love† by Wislawa Szymborska This paper is an essay is an analysis of Wislawa Szymborska’s poem â€Å"True Love.† When I first read the poem, I was struck by its sheer simplicity and passion at what Szymborska feels that it means for two people to be in love. However; upon further contemplation, I see how she uses the lovers to represent change in an otherwise boring and regimented world where all actions must be taken for the betterment and advancement of the state. â€Å"True Love† is aRead MoreHow True is True Love in Modern Times?2328 Words   |  10 PagesDoes True Love Exist? I love you. These three little words might possibly be the most powerful statement one can make to another person. In life, most yearn for the intimate affection that a certain someone can provide them. Women dream of their Prince Charming to come and sweep them off their feet, while men search for the love of their life that sets their heart on fire. But what happens when love is thrown around without a second thought? Has this four letter word become an overused clichà ©Read More True Love Does Exist Essay2229 Words   |  9 Pages Does True Love Exist?   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã¢â‚¬Å"I love you.† These three little words might possibly be the most powerful statement one can make to another person. In life, most yearn for the intimate affection that a certain someone can provide them. Women dream of their Prince Charming to come and sweep them off their feet, while men search for the love of their life that sets their heart on fire. But what happens when love is thrown around without a second thought? Has this four letter word become an overused clichà ©Read MoreThe Things They Carried And The Beginning1408 Words   |  6 Pagesinto the United States Army and sent to Vietnam where he served with the 198th Infantry Brigade† (268) . The poem â€Å"The End and the Beginning† by Wislawa Szymborska is a poem which portrays post war imagery. The poet growing up in a time where the world war 11 was staged portrays her memories of that time through her lines and her poem capture the true horrific images of the aftermath of a war and the effort that needs to be taken in order to restore a community to its past glory. The Webster’sRead MoreWhat Is Love Exactly? Love Can Be Painful, Love Can Be1185 Words   |  5 PagesWhat is love exactly? Love can be painful, love can be sad, but more than anything love should bring in happiness to a person. It is the most powerful and scariest thing in the world. It makes people do the craziest and dumbest thing that you can never think of. When you love someone, whether you make them mad, cry, upset, or hurt them, true love well never be replaced. For some people it may bring them hope, beauty, and joy into one’s life. It does not matter what kind of love it is because allRead MoreThe Role of Animals in the Unbearable Lightness of Being and Poems New and Collected1458 Words   |  6 PagesSince animals, usually pets, are sometimes an essential part of ones life, it is not surprising that we find frequent references to its role in works of social realism, such as Wislawa Szymborskas Poems New and Collected and Milan Kunderas Unbearable Lightness of Being. Animals in literature could be used to symbolize all sorts of things, but in particular, animals may represent the personality of a character. This is because as humans and animals co-exi st in the same atmosphere, certain aspects

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

The Importance of Classroom Design in Communication

Design shapes the world we live in and often influences the ways in which we behave in certain settings. From a young age, we are taught to behave according to certain social standards, and one of the primary methods with which we display these behaviours is through communication. From birth, humans must learn to communicate to get what they want and express their emotions. Although a lot of basic communication skills are taught at home, further development is taught at school to ensure certain standards are met so that young children will grow up to successfully fit in among society. These standards do not just exist on the curriculum level, but extend beyond that to the very space in which the curriculum is taught: classrooms are designed to be the ultimate learning environment, stimulating learning on every level. The design of a classroom can influence the way that children interpret information given to them, as well as the way that they apply their knowledge afterwards. Children and teachers alike use different methods of communication within a classroom. â€Å"Language is used by teachers to manage their classrooms, determine rules and routines and ensure children are aware of their expectations† (I CAN, 2008). Children use communication to practice what they have been taught, to express emotions, and ask questions. These are just some reasons for communicating in a classroom. There are different methods employed to achieve communication in a classroom and each are usedShow MoreRelatedLeadership And The Development Collaboration1146 Words   |  5 Pagesopen-line of communication is a critical factor. Communication is a two way interaction of listening and speaking in turn. One speaks while the other listens for true comprehension is a key factor. One must get an understanding before the vision can be implemented within any leadership role. The presence of collaboration in schools are the result of principals, educators, parents, and admini strative leadership in working as a team. The purpose of this essay is to explain the importance of teacher leadershipRead MoreAnd Importance Of Colorado American Sign Language Interpreters And Transliterators In Education777 Words   |  4 PagesResearch Topic: discover the relevancy and importance of Colorado American Sign Language Interpreters and Transliterators in education (ASLI/TiE) knowledge and use of Colorado Academic Standards (CAS) in their preparation for interpreting content in the classroom thus minimizing the potential for providing a non-meaning based interpretation that may contain errors. Problem Statement: Unprepared ASLI/TiE impact the depth of Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing (DHH) students critical thinking and learning requiredRead MoreThe Value of Art, Craft and Design in the Primary Classroom Essay1039 Words   |  5 PagesThe Value of Art, Craft and Design in the Primary Classroom This rationale is going to discuss the value of art, craft and design in the primary classroom. I am going to emphasise the importance that art and design has, within the primary curriculum. I will also emphasise, how my resource pack promotes the value of creativity in the primary classroom. The teaching of art and design has many benefits, one main benefit is that it promotes children’s creativity. In today’s society we live in a worldRead MoreEssay on Creating a Supportive Learning Environment 1381 Words   |  6 PagesAs teachers we should focus on the importance of creating supportive learning environments which instil the notion of inclusivity of all students, with or without disabilities. As students enter the classroom they bring a mixture of cultural, academic and behavioural diversity with them (Watkins, 2005). As teachers we need to embrace the unique qualities that each student holds and make the most of this diversity to enhance the learning outcomes of all students. This critical reflection aims to identifyRead MoreDifference Between Validity And Reliability988 Words   |  4 Pagesadministered it produces the same level of learning. 2. According to your textbook, what are the five classroom Assessment Competencies. Please list and describe each one. I. Clear purpose- Clear purpose means that the results and process of an assessment serves a purpose that is clear and appropriate. The way to complete a clear purpose is to identify who are the main people using the classroom assessment information and know what the needs of the information are. It is also important to understandRead MoreThe Roles Of Teachers Teachers1584 Words   |  7 PagesThe roles of teachers I believe teachers play multiple roles that extend beyond the classroom. They take classes continuously, attend professional development sessions, and research new approaches to learning on their own time. These are done with the purpose of expanding their knowledge in teaching and to ensure that the school day runs smoothly for the entire class. For example, Mrs. Shuffield spend her breaks researching videos to enhance her writing and science lessons. This week, she presentedRead MoreThe Problem Marchand And Furrer Essay1326 Words   |  6 Pagesproblem Marchand and Furrer (2014) presented in this research study is to determine if classroom teachers, and those that develop testing materials threaten outside standards and prerequisites of validity. In order for teachers to develop classroom-based assessments, they must know their students and focus assessments on what is taught in classrooms. The authors sought to know if large-scale testing and classroom context factors cause uncon trolled variables that affect the outcomes of assessments.Read MoreAn Age Of Multimedia Authoring1461 Words   |  6 Pagesit is widely researched and recognised that children from a very young age are exposed to and competently engage in a range of digital technologies and communications while at home. Over the past two decades, conventional literacy of reading and writing has shifted to multiple forms of multimodal texts, which are changing conventional classrooms into a ‘digital education revolution’. With the research from two national initiatives, the Digital Education Revolution (Australian Government, DEEWR, 2008)Read MoreMy Goals And Responsibilities Of My School Years1153 Words   |  5 Pagesam dedicated and determined in my desire to be successful. One of the main regrets of my school years was the failure to recongise the significance and importance of my education. Since then I left my graduate job and have devoted everything I can to strive for excellenc e and academia, and throughout this have discovered a love for the classroom and the ability to show that anything is possible in life if we truly believe in our goals and dreams. My university years taught me how to open up toRead MoreE Learning : Using Electronic Learning Essay1529 Words   |  7 PagesE-Learning Better known as electronic learning, e-learning is defined as a â€Å"wide set of applications and processes, such as web-based learning, computer-based learning, virtual classrooms, and digital collaboration. It includes delivery of content via internet, intranet/extranet, LAN/WAN (local area network/ wide area network) audio/videotape, satellite broadcast, interactive TV, and CD-ROM† (Paul, 2014). E-learning is a developing method to administer education that was adopted, first by institutions

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Three Strikes Law free essay sample

In this act, the statute of three strike sentencing provides a mandatory life imprisonment sentence for convicted felons that have been convicted in a federal court for a serious and/or violent felony and they commit two or more previous crimes that they are convicted of in federal and/or state court system in which at least one of the crimes is a serious and/or violent crime. These crimes can be but are not limited to murder, sex offenses, robbery, and kidnapping. The issue at hand is the question whether this act is really as effective as it is made out to be. Convicted felons are given two more chances to straighten up their acts and get their lives together to be able to live and reside in society. I believe that people who are convicted of a serious crime the first go-round should be punish by the same seriousness as the crime in which he or she committed. If they are giving a second chance to make become civilized and they commit another serious crime, then that should be an automatic life imprisonment sentence. I do not believe that they should be given a third chance. Once someone who commits a crime, they have the potential to commit the same or even more severe crime. It should not have to take the law and criminal justice system three chances to realize that a convicted felon is unfit to live along side with civilians. With this being said, this â€Å"three strike† sentencing should be abolished. This issue is very important because this sentence puts civilians back at risk of potential harm and threat by convicted felons, especially those who have convicted murder and/or sex crimes. Civilians should not have to continually be put back at risk by releasing dangerous convicted felons back into society because the system feels that they are capable of becoming civilized. This may be in some cases but certain not for all or even most. They should be stricter and set higher standards on how the system evaluates and establish such decisions, especially when it is society that will be affected mostly. These felons have previously committed serious crimes that had already altered the way of living amongst those people who were affected by the crimes they have committed. Giving them a second chance is one thing but to give them a third chance after the second chance fell through is completely ludicrous. The â€Å"three strike† sentencing should be abolished. Everyone may deserve a second chance but definitely not a third one. The â€Å"three strikes† sentencing law was originated in California. It was created in efforts to prevent offenders from becoming repeat offenders. (Kitchen, 2008). The three strikes sentencing states that when a person is convicted of three felonies, crimes in which a person can be sentenced to one or more years in prison, they will be sentenced to an automatic twenty-five to life sentence. (Messerli, 2006). There has been much criticism on this law and the effectiveness of it. It has mostly been condemned for applying a one-size-fit-all sentence to repeat offenders. But like any law, there are advantages and disadvantages. An advantage of the three strikes law is that it gives convicted felons a limited number of chances, normally three, in efforts to rehabilitate them to make them able to live in the civilized community. It gives those people who commit crimes the opportunity to change their ways of living and provide guidance to becoming a civilized person who abide by the laws that are set in the society. For instance, if a minor committed a crime considered to be a felony and is charged with such, this law could help him ways to stay out of trouble and prevent he or she from becoming a repeat offender. It is the second and third chances that are given to provide the turnaround for convicted felons to make the best out of life. Another advantage of the three strikes law is that it provides assistance to repair a defective justice system so convicted felons who choose to be repeat offenders will stay in prison. In today’s society, most crimes are committed by repeat offenders. (Kitchen, 2008). One possible reason this could be is that it is the way of life for most. The streets and committing crimes is all they know and have grown accustomed to. They commit crimes in hopes of never getting caught but they eventually they do. But even with this, they continue to commit crimes because that is what they know. Another possible reason could be that some repeat offenders commit crimes because they would rather be locked up behind bars then out in society. Some actually know that they are incapable of living civilized lives so they choose to commit crimes to be in a place where they are accepted for who they are. So because most crimes are committed by repeat offenders, this law was implemented as an instrument that the system can use to prevent such actions. It also helps with the reduction of liberal sentences, plea bargaining, and case backlogs. (Kitchen, 2009) Another advantage is that the law can efficiently discourage offenders who have already acquired two felonies from committing further acts. This is where the rehabilitation aspect falls into place. The three strikes law seems to assist with steering offenders away from committing further crimes because following the second conviction there may be a constant reminder of what will occur if the felon was to commit another criminal act; his or her freedom will be stripped and will receive a prison sentence of a mandatory twenty-five years, or worst, a life sentence. It’s the life sentence that may be the underlying reason that some actually become rehabilitated and stop committing crimes.

Thursday, April 9, 2020

American Foreign Policy since the Second World War Essay Example Essay Example

American Foreign Policy since the Second World War Essay Example Paper American Foreign Policy since the Second World War Essay Introduction Right through its history, America has not hesitated to use force under the pretexts of principles, sovereignty and justice. American military intervention in world affairs has risen drastically since the end of the Second World War. The period following the Second World War saw America assume the role of a superpower that headed the western coalition in what was a bipolar world. In a way, the nuclear bombing of Japan was the first of its international digressions and the ongoing Iraq quagmire the latest. Since the collapse of Soviet Union, America has had at its disposal the most potent military force. Its economic structure complements military spending; leading to a military industrial complex. The 2003 Allied invasion of Iraq was not an exception. Neither was United States’ role in the ugly end to the Second World War. Noted political commentator Ivo Daalder raises some valid questions regarding the legitimacy of the invasion of Iraq. Daalder argues that the invasion was i llegitimate on two counts: 1.there was no provocation from Iraq and 2.the United Nations Security Council did not approve of the war. Military actions of countries such as Iran and North Korea were condemned by the U.N. and the United States alike. In the same vein, the dropping of atomic bombs over Hiroshima and Nagasaki also don’t meet basic humanitarian standards. De-classified information from the period suggests that there was no significant threat from Japan at the time of these bombings. Hence, it could be stated that the United States deserves the worldwide condemnation that it elicited then and continues to elicit now (Gaddis, 2005). American Foreign Policy since the Second World War Essay Body Paragraphs On the eve of the American invasion of Iraq, the German Foreign minister Joschka Fischer openly questioned American intentions behind the intervention. Such doubts were expressed by other members of the European Union as well. The differences were not just at the diplomatic level. A public opinion poll conducted on the eve of the war revealed how an overwhelming majority of people in Europe disagreed with the American official line. More importantly, they believed that the war was illegitimate. The public sentiment in the United States was exactly the opposite. Some analysts point that the divide in public opinion is nothing more than a reflection of the prevailing world order. Nevertheless, such a simplistic reason is insufficient in explaining a pervasive set of beliefs and attitudes. Similar sentiments were expressed by allies and rivals alike with regard to the situation in Japan in 1945. Hence, some historical parallels could be discerned (Anderson, 2005). The Coalition of the W illing’s failure to properly plan and execute its â€Å"liberation† of Iraq has led to a complete breakdown of law and order in the country. The insurgency following this collapse has affected the Iraqi civilian population more than the coalition troops. This outcome is in contradiction with the mission of â€Å"liberating the people of Iraq†. The setting of the Iraqi Governing Council to restore the situation has proved to be a failure. The exercise of setting up a democratically elected leadership in Iraq is perceived as a sham by neutral observers. Similarly, the victims of the nuclear bombardments in Japan were mostly civilians. So, in essence, the present situation in Iraq is comparable to the post-bombardment Japan (Anderson, 2005). It is an open secret that the middle-east region is of strategic importance. Any country with aspirations to dominate the world will have to have â€Å"control† over the region’s resources (read oil) and governmen ts. The United States, the only superpower at the time, was not above this ambition. Noted American intellectual Noam Chomsky points to glaring misinformation released by the White House in his recent scholarship. In Chomsky’s own words, â€Å"The US wasn’t upholding any high principle in Iraq, nor was any of its allies. The reason for the unprecedented response to Saddam Hussein wasn’t his brutal aggression — it was because he stepped on the wrong toes. Saddam Hussein is a murderous gangster — exactly as he was before the War. He was even our friend and favored trading partner at one point in time. His dictatorship of Iraq comprises many atrocious acts, but well within the range of many similar crimes conducted by the US and its allies, and nowhere near as terrible as some.† (Chomsky, 2004) Unfortunately, not many people know this reality. The false propaganda from the government quarters was so grand in scale that it appeared genuine and t ruthful. If maintaining sovereignty of independent countries is the reason for the war, then why didn’t the U.S. Government interfere with the Chinese annexation of Tibet and other such atrocities across the world? Hence, the real motivations for American intervention were buried under a veil of propaganda. In this sense, the Iraq War, as understood by the general public, is illegitimate. More importantly, the leaders (military as well as executive) who are responsible for the present mess are culpable under international human rights laws (Gaddis, 2005). In this context, which was eventually modified, and always subject to criticism, when it became clear toward the end of 2003 that Iraq did not possess WMD, by the 2004 updating of rhetoric to â€Å"Iraq had only had the potential to acquire and use them†, and the official line that terrorism was a result of regime change in Iraq (which escalated the activities of guerrillas and insurgents). Just as the Afghanistan and Iraq wars have called for an acceptance of law and legitimacy, they have also raised questions regarding the suitability of such terms as â€Å"insurgents, guerrillas, rebels, resistance members, terrorists, detainees, prisoners of war, lawful combatants, unlawful combatants, military commissions, competent tribunals, as well as others expressions.† What is required at present is a critical need to clarify concepts of law and legitimacy in the wake of these invasions (Chomsky, 2004). While the chief cause for both incidents of aggression is largely systemic, individual decision making played a part too. De-classified information of the Second World War period indicates that President Truman gave orders for using nuclear weapons against the general consensus of his inner circle. In the case of the Iraq war too, President Bush’s decision to invade is attributable to his personal stake in the oil industry. Kofi Annan, the then Secretary-General of the United Nations had displayed tact and skilful diplomacy in all his interactions with the United States government. It is an indication of the gravity of the violation, that he openly questioned the legality of the Iraq war. Other notable diplomats too joined Annan in his condemnation of the war. For example, A.M. Slaughter argued that the invasion of Iraq by America and its allies â€Å"was categorically illegal under international law†. Richard Falk noted that â€Å"the illegality of recourse to war against Iraq in 2003 was clear. It was also clear before and after the war that there was no reasonable basis for invoking the ‘illegal but legitimate’ formula used by the Independent International Commission for Kosovo to deal with an exceptional circumstance of humanitarian emergency.† The academia across the world was also of a similar view. A majority of influential diplomats and political commentators outside of the United States concurred with these views. At the time of t he Japanese bombings though, there was no United Nations or any influential mediating organization. In this sense, the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was legal, but only at a technical level. If standards of basic human rights and humanitarianism are applied, then the Japanese episode is as gross a violation as the present Iraqi one (Anderson, 2005). The sentiments of people outside of the United States in this debate are understandable. For example, there are widespread concerns regarding American hegemony in general and its foreign policies in particular. The adoption of a philosophy of unilateral action made the concerns all the more real. American policies tended to focus heavily on its security. The rationale was that if the only superpower in the world were to be secure, world security as such will advance. This sounds reasonable at a theoretical level. But the actual results tell a different story (Gaddis, 2005). The meaning of Article 51 of the UN Charter is of relevance in determining the legitimacy of the war in Iraq. Most legal professionals and civil law experts agree that the words â€Å"armed attack† mentioned in Article 51 of the 1945 edition must be read literally. In other words, there must have been material damages suffered by the affected nation before there can be a legitimate military response against the instigator. But there is a problem with such an interpretation. The weaponry and military systems of now are far more advanced than the ones used in 1945. Similarly, international consensus, as provided by the United Nations, was absent during the Second World War. With the acquisition of nuclear technology, a country can annihilate its target with the push of a button (Simes, 2003). All it takes is a few seconds and there is virtually no time to defend or respond. The judiciary is now gaining an understanding of this new reality and hence has come to accept â€Å"pre-emptive or anticipatory military action† as a lawful one. Without such proactive actions international peace and security will be jeopardized. So, if the U.N. Charter were to be read literally, the Iraq war is illegitimate. But, when it is placed in the context of advances in military technology and interpreted more broadly, the Iraq war may be declared a lawful one (Gaddis, 2005). We will write a custom essay sample on American Foreign Policy since the Second World War Essay Example specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on American Foreign Policy since the Second World War Essay Example specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on American Foreign Policy since the Second World War Essay Example specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer

Monday, March 9, 2020

Free Essays on Earthquake

I. Introduction Earthquakes in California are certainly not a surprise. What is a surprise is their unpredictability and randomness. Geologists say there is roughly a 50 percent chance that a magnitude 8 or more quake will hit the Los Angeles area sometime over the next 30 years. And, over the past twenty years, the Los Angeles area has witnessed several earthquakes, and in particular, two that were quite devastating; the 1971 San Fernando earthquake, and the January 17, 1994, Northridge Earthquake. Given the certainty that earthquakes will occur, they still seem to come as a surprise, and leave many communities unprepared to deal with their aftermath. For example, on October 1, 1987, at 7:42 a.m. the residents of the Los Angeles basin got a jolting reminder of the perils of "living on the fault line." This was due to the so-called Whittier Narrows earthquake. Hardest hit by the quake, was Whittier (pop. 72,000). Whittier is twelve miles from downtown Los Angeles and was the community closest to the epicenter. When the quake, registering 6.1 on the Richter scale, first struck, it was thought to be centered along the Old Whittier Fault. However, after extensive study, it was determined that it was actually the result of a "new" fault, or a fault that had not previously been discovered by scientists. II. Lessons Learned From The 1987 Whittier Narrows Earthquake What are the lessons learned from the Whittier quake? And, how does this quake compare to other more recent, higher magnitude quakes? Despite the fact that regular warnings are part of California living, repeated in schools, in earthquake exercises, by local and state governments, and even in the front of telephone books, many people were caught off-guard and panicked. Fortunately, Californians learned a lot from the Whittier quake. The Whittier earthquake was not the "big one" that Angelenos perpetually wait for. This may be hard to comprehend given the... Free Essays on Earthquake Free Essays on Earthquake I. Introduction Earthquakes in California are certainly not a surprise. What is a surprise is their unpredictability and randomness. Geologists say there is roughly a 50 percent chance that a magnitude 8 or more quake will hit the Los Angeles area sometime over the next 30 years. And, over the past twenty years, the Los Angeles area has witnessed several earthquakes, and in particular, two that were quite devastating; the 1971 San Fernando earthquake, and the January 17, 1994, Northridge Earthquake. Given the certainty that earthquakes will occur, they still seem to come as a surprise, and leave many communities unprepared to deal with their aftermath. For example, on October 1, 1987, at 7:42 a.m. the residents of the Los Angeles basin got a jolting reminder of the perils of "living on the fault line." This was due to the so-called Whittier Narrows earthquake. Hardest hit by the quake, was Whittier (pop. 72,000). Whittier is twelve miles from downtown Los Angeles and was the community closest to the epicenter. When the quake, registering 6.1 on the Richter scale, first struck, it was thought to be centered along the Old Whittier Fault. However, after extensive study, it was determined that it was actually the result of a "new" fault, or a fault that had not previously been discovered by scientists. II. Lessons Learned From The 1987 Whittier Narrows Earthquake What are the lessons learned from the Whittier quake? And, how does this quake compare to other more recent, higher magnitude quakes? Despite the fact that regular warnings are part of California living, repeated in schools, in earthquake exercises, by local and state governments, and even in the front of telephone books, many people were caught off-guard and panicked. Fortunately, Californians learned a lot from the Whittier quake. The Whittier earthquake was not the "big one" that Angelenos perpetually wait for. This may be hard to comprehend given the...

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Employment System in Middle East Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2250 words

Employment System in Middle East - Essay Example In the third section, a linkage is created between the poverty and employment. In the forth section, linkage of social welfare and employment is created and finally in the last section conclusion is given. Middle Eastern countries comprise of the following countries, i.e. Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Bahrain, Oman Qatar, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Yemen, Israel, Jordon, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey, Cyprus, Egypt, Gaza Strip and West Bank. Not all of these countries are well established but there is a good demand of employment in these countries, especially Africa and Dubai. The Growth level in this system is emerging with the passage of time but unemployment rate has not declined to a greater degree. There is still a large amount of population unemployed. This paper focuses on the linkage between the poverty and employment & social welfare and employment. The section three and four will emphasize the two concepts in detail. In 2004-2006 when all the rest of the world was going through a recession in the employment industry, some middle-eastern countries passed through the job creation phase. There was employment opportunity in these areas because the private sector showed major development. There were a lot of foreign and domestic investments made by the local and foreign companies that boosted, enhanced and created job opportunities for the unemployment class. These job opportunities catered well as not only were the demand of the young, energetic, talented and capable people met but also these unemployed workers now were provided with the platform where they could put their best efforts to achieve their potential goals. But it sad to state that apart from all the opportunities, the unemployment level in the Middle East was still very high and a major sector of the workforce still remains unemployed. Middle East is also faced with another disappointing workforce practice, i.e. discrimination has been observed in the middle-eastern countries, as women who are a foremost source still experience through a high level of unemployment rate. It has also been stated that middle-eastern women are more talented and educated than as compared to men but regardless of all the efforts made they are still lacking far behind. This discrimination is widely observed in Egypt. The Middle East is experiencing high economic growth rate and it has been stated that from 2004 to 2006, its real GDP per capita had a 4.0 percent annual increase. But despite all these growths, Middle East also suffers from 25 percent youth employment (which is the recorded as the highest among all regions). Among the employed the highest level are new job seekers of age range of 15- 24 years who account for 50 percent of the unemployment in the region. On the other hand young people with secondary and post secondary education are also faced with employment issues such as mismatching skills and long queues for